Monday, May 23, 2016

Royal Lace

 


It's the time of year when the hedgerows and meadows, are once again filled with wildflowers.
Queen Anne's Lace (Daucus carota)
This wild version of the carrot is one of the most common and best known "weeds" we have.
It's hard to imagine what a fallow field would look like in late spring without the white flower heads bobbing in the breeze.

It is thought that the carrots escaped from the gardens of the early European settlers in North America, having thrived in the wild to become what we know as Queen Anne's Lace.


 
 
It is so called because the flowers resemble lace; the red flower in the center represents a blood droplet where Queen Anne pricked herself with a needle when she was making the lace. The function of the tiny red flower, colored by anthocyanin, is to attract insects.
 
 The plant is commonly referred to as Cow Parsley  ( Anthriscus sylvestris )  in Great Britain.
 

12 comments:

DJan said...

It also looks a lot like hemlock, so be careful when thinking you might have cow parsley when you have hemlock. The big difference is that hemlock has purple streaks on the stalks. Just FYI. :-)

Szara Sowa said...

What too romantic name. We are naming it wild carrot.

Betsy Brock said...

So pretty...I've always loved it!

Patsy said...

Love seeing this on the sides of back roads,
but we do see it in the city.

Tweedles -- that's me said...

Oh it is so very beautiful.. I think we have some too
love
tweedles

Henny Penny said...

I love Queen Anne's Lace, and was noticing today that it is in bloom, which surprised me. I was thinking Queen Anne's Lace bloomed later in the summer. Everything seems a little different this year, but I'm sure it's just me. May has been such a cool rainy month and usually it is warm and sunny. Take care!

donna baker said...

We have a variety of that here too, but no red drop in the middle. I didn't know it was the same as cow parsley.

The Furry Gnome said...

My mother used Quenn Anne's Lace for her wedding bouquet 76 years ago. But they don't bloom here til much later.

Kathy said...

What a wealth of information I have gained about Queen Anne's lace. I never knew any of that. I have seen it though. It's very pretty.

Bernideen said...

I love - love Queen Anne's Lace. I dug some plants up in the snow almost in Colorado back in early March and brought them. I think 5-6 plants and they are doing well here in Missouri and should be blooming as this is their 2nd year. The funny thing is originally - all the seed years back came from here! It all came back home so to speak. Yours is lovely!

rebecca said...

Our Queen Anne's Lace hasn't made its appearance up here yet...
I just finished reading Susan Branch's book "A Fine Romance" re. her travels in England. She mentioned cows parsley and I didn't know what she was talking about. Now I do :)

L. D. said...

We have it growing in the dit ches along the roads. I know at a certain time in late spring we have alot of white flowers and it is Queen Anne's Lace. We must consider it a friendly weed or the road crews would go after it.