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Wednesday, September 16, 2009

" We'll Meet Again."



Topping the number one record in Britain this week, is Dame Vera Lynn, at age 92. The top one hundred, included the newly remastered Beatles albums, and several Michael Jackson recordings.

Lynn was born Vera Margaret Welch on 20 March 1917, in East Ham, then in Essex, now part of Greater London. Her father was a plumber and Vera Welch grew up with her parents' Cockney accent, which she has never abandoned. She began singing at the age of seven in a working men's club, and later adopted her grandmother's maiden name for her stage name.

The much loved singer, who 70 years ago, recorded an evocative reminder of home for British soldiers fighting far away, became the oldest living recording artist to claim the number one spot, with her album "We'll Meet Again" _ The Very Best of Vera Lynn",

Lynn was fondly known as the "Forces Sweetheart", with her songs including, "We'll Meet Again", and "They'll be Bluebirds Over, The White Cliffs of Dover", were all wartime's anthems.

Music writer John Aizlewood attributed the popularity to the times in which we live. "In a sense, it's comfort music,". "These are quite uncertain times, and quite austere times, as well. And in these times, you need music to help you through."

He attributed much of Lynn's resurgence to nostalgia, a longing for simplicity and old-fashioned values, and "pension power".

Made a Dame by Queen Elizabeth in 1975, she has been an established part of significant national functions, such as the 2005 anniversary celebrations of World War II's Victory in Europe Day, and the late Queen Mother's birthday.


Please don't forget to scroll to the bottom of the sidebar, and click the LARGE round button, to turn off the PLAYLIST...

Info credit: Wikipedia and BBC News

16 comments:

Snowbrush said...

Peggy is a big Vera Lynn fan. I watch those old Youtube videos of her singing to men, many of whom were about to cross the channel and be killed, and it gets to me.

Snowbrush said...

P. S. When I hit your player just now, I got two pieces of music, the one you always have on your blog and hers.

A Brit in Tennessee said...

Snowbrush: Glad to hear Peggy is a big Vera Lynn fan, she had a wonderful voice.
Thank you for the "heads up" on the music, but I would have to permanently turn off my PLAYLIST player, I have added a side note asking the reader to do so temporarily.

Dave Pie-n-Mash said...

I didn't even know she was still alive but I am glad to see she is.

Robin's New Song said...

what a lovely woman and lovely voice, even in old age.

Wanda said...

Loved hearing Vera Lynn's songs and seeing the Ciffs of Dover in the video...all were beautiful!

Sunny said...

Thank you for this lovely post. My Dad was in the RAF and loved Vera Lynn. I grew up listening to her songs.
She's quite a remarkable woman.
Sunny :)

Deanna said...

Wow what a sweet singing voice!!!
This was fun to get to hear her sing.
Hope that you are doing well,
d

Loree said...

Wow. Who would've thought that she would top the charts at her age? Amazing. And she looks pretty good for 92 too.

jeannette stgermain said...

That's a lovely tribute you did for Vera Lynn - she looks and sounds good, even in old age!

AmyK said...

What a lovely post to a truly beautiful woman. Her songs moved both of our countries. I knew the songs, but never knew a thing a bout her. Thank you so much for her story.

DJan said...

I'm sitting in bed here early in the morning, husband asleep beside me, so I'll listen later (I've got the sound turned off so he can sleep). But she's looking good at 92! How inspiring!

bennie and patsy said...

It gives me chills to see and hear the song with all of those men of the past. I fear we will never rally together like that again.
Patsy

Smitten by Britain said...

Isn't she lovely? What a fabulous voice.

Gill - That British Woman said...

I didn't realize she is still alive, when you think of Britain, I think of her and her war time songs, truly an icon......

Gill in Canada

...mmm... said...

Marvelous. I was so happy to read this when I read it online in the Telegraph. Brilliant!